A beginners guide to blush

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PRODUCTS PICTURED  // Revolution Single Sugar Blush| Revolution Cream Blush Palette | Real Techniques Tapered Blush Brush | Sleek Rose Gold Blush | Revolution Ultra Flawless Powder Blush | Max Factor Cream Lovely Pink Blusher | Collection Gorgeous Glow Blush Block

I’m trying out a new series on my blog where I try and explain makeup to someone who knows nothing about it. I was thinking back to when I first started makeup and how great it would’ve been to have had a proper guide telling me what’s what and decided to give it a shot. I’m probably not the best person to be talking about this as I’ve never studied beauty professionally or anything but this is just what I’ve learned over the years compiled into a series of blog posts.

Today we will be discussing blush. Blush or blusher, is a rogue beauty product that is applied onto the apples of the cheek, to give a youthful glow, the appearance of a rosy complexion and to empathize the cheekbones.

Blush, known as Rogue up until quite recently, was used as early as ancient Egypt, were both men and women wore it on their lips to make them pop. Of course it was far from the soft powders and light liquid’s we use today. Back then blush was a thick taste, made from crushed fruit and vegetables, like strawberries and red beets. I for one am thankful we’ve changed the way we make blush now, because rubbing crushed strawberries on my lips and cheeks just sounds sticky.

Blush was also popular in Greece, were wearing blush was a sign of being wealthy. As a result many women wore the cosmetic, which at the time was made of seeds and berries. In Victoria England however, cosmetics were seen as a sign of low morals, and so women resorted to pinching their cheeks to get that rosy glow. Luckily, rubbing crushed berries onto our cheeks seems to be a thing of the past, but I know some people, myself included at times, still use that pinching cheeks trick.

Today blush is staple in any women’s makeup bag. Blushes are mostly commonly pink, peach or red toned, but you can buy them in pretty much every colour, and I have actually seen quite a few purple and orange blushes. If you’re like me and you’ve got fair complexion, it’s probably best to stick to the more peachy colours. Reds and hot pinks can look quite clown like on the skin and if you want to keep your face looking more natural you want to look out for the peachy and light pink colours. If you’ve got dark skin you are fortunate enough that you can pretty much work any colour, however saying that I think really dark reds, hot pinks and even purples really pop on dark skin.

Powder –
The most common type of blush you will find is powder blush. It comes in a variety of colours and almost all bands have some sort of powder blush. It’s all usually in a pressed compact form although you can find loose powder blushes if you really look for them. Powder blush is the easiest type of blush to blend, especially if you’ve got oily skin, as they help absorb some of the oil. If you’ve got dry skin, you may find powder blushes take a lot longer to blend, or they may even just sit on top of the skin instead of really being stuck onto apples of your cheeks. There are many different powder blushes out there that are matte, shimmery and dewy.

Recommended Products: Nars Orgasm – £23.00, it’s a soft rose pink shade that gives a nice dewy glow to the skin. Sleek’s Shimmer Blush in Rose Gold – £4.99 is a nice cheaper alternative that gives the same look at a quarter of the price. For shimmery blush I would recommend, Bobby Brown Shimmer Brick – £34.00 or Collection Gorgeous Glow Block – £4.19. They are both basically the same product and I prefer the collection blush most of the time. I don’t really wear matte blush that often as I find it washes me out, but when I do I find Revolution Blushes are really nice, especially the Powder Blush in Sugar – £1.

Liquid –
Liquid blush, as you have probably guessed, is blush in liquid form. It’s one of the least popular types of blush, due to the fact it’s difficult to work with. It drys very quickly, so you need to get it from the bottle to your face as quickly as you can, otherwise it may dry, leaving two large red dots on your cheeks which never looks good unless your going for that clown look. They do, however tend to last a lot longer than powder blush. Another bonus of liquid blushes is they tend to come in rather large tubes or bottles with pumps, which means you get more product and therefore more for you money. Also if you happen to drop your liquid blush on the floor it wont smash like a power blush. Liquid blush works well with all skin types, but works best on dry skin. If you’re a first time blush user though, I wouldn’t recommend liquid blush.

Recommended Products: Daniel Sandler Watercolour Liquid Blush – £15.50 & Bourjois Aqua Blush – £8.99

Tint/Stain –
Cheek stain or sometimes called cheek tint is a gel mixture, that when applied to the apples of the cheeks gives the appearance of blush. They are often water-based, oil-free and alcohol free, meaning they work well with all skin types. Because cheek stains temporarily stains the skin, it lasts a lot longer than most other types of blush.  It’s also a lot lighter on the skins surface too, so it works well if you’ve got oily skin. You can blend them with a brush or makeup sponge, although a sponge tends to work best, in my opinion.

Recommended Products: Benefit Posietint – £24.50, The Body Shop lip & stain cheek – £8.00 & Stila Cruch Lip & Cheek Stain £16.00

Cream –
Cream blush is a lot thicker and heavier than other types of blush. It usually comes in pot, compact or stick form. Cream blush is more moisturizing than other types of blushes, so it’s amazing on dry skin. It is a little harder to blend, and like liquid blush it dries quickly so you have to work with this fast, but unlike powder blush it does last a lot longer, as it sticks to the skin properly instead of just resting on top of it. It also gives a nice natural glow, and looks a lot nicer on fair skin than other blushes.

Recommended Products: Barry M Cream Make Me Blush – £4.49, Bourjois Little Round Pot Cream Blush – £7.99 & Rimmel London Royal Blush Blusher – £4.49

Mousse –
Mousse Blush, sometimes called whipped blush, is not as popularly used as cream, tint, liquid or powder blushes. The mixture is whipped to increase the amount of air inside the mixture, hence it’s name. It’s got the same texture as hair mousse and is often packed into a small jar. It’s good for dry skin, but should be avoided if you have oily skin as it may just slide off and not last very long.

Recommended Products: Maybelline Dream Lumi Touch Blusher – £6.49.

Thanks for reading and if you have any questions, hints, tips or recommend products feel free to post them below! I’d love to hear your recommendations and ideas.